Labor

  • July 08, 2024

    5 Labor Battles To Watch In 2024's 2nd Half

    The second half of the year will feature action in several cases with major implications for the labor law landscape, including SpaceX's suits seeking to gut the National Labor Relations Board and a board case that could extend organizing rights to college athletes. Here, Law360 looks at these and other cases to watch in the second half of 2024.

  • July 05, 2024

    How Reshaped Circuit Courts Are Faring At The High Court

    Seminal rulings from the U.S. Supreme Court's latest term will reshape many facets of American society in the coming years. Already, however, the rulings offer glimpses of how the justices view specific circuit courts, which have themselves been reshaped by an abundance of new judges.

  • July 05, 2024

    Breaking Down The Vote: The High Court Term In Review

    The U.S. Supreme Court's lethargic pace of decision-making this term left the justices to issue a slew of highly anticipated and controversial rulings during the term's final week — rulings that put the court's ideological divisions on vivid display. Here, Law360 takes a data dive into the numbers behind this court term.

  • July 05, 2024

    High Court Flexes Muscle To Limit Administrative State

    The U.S. Supreme Court's dismantling of a 40-year-old judicial deference doctrine, coupled with rulings stripping federal agencies of certain enforcement powers and exposing them to additional litigation, has established the October 2023 term as likely the most consequential in administrative law history.

  • July 05, 2024

    The Sharpest Dissents From The Supreme Court Term

    The U.S. Supreme Court's session ended with a series of blockbuster cases that granted the president broad immunity, changed federal gun policy and kneecapped administrative agencies. And many of the biggest decisions fell along partisan lines.

  • July 05, 2024

    5 Moments That Shaped The Supreme Court's Jan. 6 Decision

    When the high court limited the scope of a federal obstruction statute used to charge hundreds of rioters who stormed the Capitol, the justices did not vote along ideological lines. In a year marked by 6-3 splits, what accounts for the departure? Here are some moments from oral arguments that may have swayed the justices.

  • July 05, 2024

    The Funniest Moments Of The Supreme Court's Term

    In a U.S. Supreme Court term teeming with serious showdowns, the august air at oral arguments filled with laughter after an attorney mentioned her plastic surgeon and a justice seemed to diss his colleagues, to cite just two of the term's mirthful moments. Here, we look at the funniest moments of the term.

  • July 05, 2024

    The Firms That Won Big At The Supreme Court

    This U.S. Supreme Court term featured high-stakes oral arguments on issues including gerrymandering, abortion and federal agency authority, and a hot bench ever more willing to engage in a lengthy back-and-forth with advocates. Here's a look at the law firms that argued the most cases and how they fared.

  • July 05, 2024

    UAW Wants 'Highly Sensitive' Strategy Kept From Monitor

    United Auto Workers is urging a Michigan federal judge to declare that the union can withhold confidential information — such as "highly sensitive" collective bargaining strategy — from the "unprecedented" amount of discovery requested by a monitor investigating alleged financial misconduct and retaliation within the union.

  • July 05, 2024

    Farmworkers Union Wins Partial Block Of DOL Wage Rules

    A Washington federal judge partly blocked U.S. Department of Labor rules on prevailing wage rates that a union claimed depressed farmworkers' wages, saying the agency failed to consider effects on workers and must reinstate wage rates from 2020.

  • July 05, 2024

    The 3 Biggest Labor Law Decisions Of 2024 So Far

    The first half of 2024 included several significant decisions for labor law, including the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling toughening the standard for evaluating injunctions requested by National Labor Relations Board prosecutors and a Texas federal judge's decision striking down the board's joint employer rule. Here, Law360 examines these cases, as well as some of the other most important decisions from the first six months of the year.

  • July 05, 2024

    NY Forecast: Judge Weighs Dismissal Of Service Fee Tip Suit

    A New York federal judge on Monday will consider a Long Island restaurant's bid to dismiss a worker's lawsuit claiming the restaurant violated federal and state law by retaining a service charge instead of dividing it among servers as it told customers.

  • July 03, 2024

    SpaceX Can Proceed With 2nd NLRB Constitutional Challenge

    The National Labor Relations Board can't press pause on SpaceX's second fight over the constitutionality of the agency's structure, a Texas federal judge ruled Wednesday, saying the board couldn't demonstrate why the proceeding should be stayed.

  • July 03, 2024

    AFSCME Sues Philadelphia Over Mandatory Return To Office

    American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees affiliates accused the city of Philadelphia of violating labor contracts by not bargaining over the end to remote work, telling a state court that the city's move would impact around 2,900 workers in the bargaining unit.

  • July 03, 2024

    NLRB's First Cemex Order Provides Little Clarity On Rule

    The National Labor Relations Board recently issued its first order requiring an employer to bargain with a union under a relaxed standard for such orders based on violations during representation elections, but attorneys said the decision did not do much to clarify how the new standard will work.

  • July 03, 2024

    Owner Of Defunct Hotel Owes Engineers $400K, Union Says

    The owner of a shuttered New York City hotel is on the hook for more than $400,000 in payments to engineers required under an arbitration award, a hotel workers union argued, telling a federal judge that the owner can't evade the arbitrator's decision.

  • July 03, 2024

    Bronx Defenders Union Braces To Strike In Less Than 3 Weeks

    The Bronx Defenders Union's bargaining committee voted on Tuesday to authorize an unlimited unfair labor practice strike beginning the week of July 22, saying the organization's staff continue to face high attrition, unwieldy caseloads and some of the lowest pay rates of New York City's public defenders.

  • July 03, 2024

    After Chevron Deference: What Lawyers Need To Know

    This term, the U.S. Supreme Court overturned Chevron deference, a precedent established 40 years ago that said when judges could defer to federal agencies' interpretations of law in rulemaking. Here, catch up with Law360's coverage of what is likely to happen next.

  • July 02, 2024

    Pact Shouldn't Stop Ky. Public Defenders Row, NLRB GC Says

    A National Labor Relations Board dispute alleging a Kentucky public defender corporation refused to bargain over outsourcing of work with an International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers local should go forward, agency prosecutors argued, saying a nonboard settlement between the parties doesn't warrant termination of the proceeding.

  • July 02, 2024

    Gig Drivers' Union Rights Make It To Mass. Ballot

    Massachusetts voters will decide in November whether to give app-based drivers the right to unionize after supporters of a proposed ballot initiative submitted a batch of signatures to the state Tuesday, the Service Employees International Union announced. 

  • July 02, 2024

    Mich. Hospital Mounts NLRB Constitutionality Claims In Court

    A Michigan hospital that withdrew recognition from a union urged a federal judge to dismiss a National Labor Relations Board injunction bid against it, arguing the related agency proceeding is unconstitutional because administrative law judges and the board have protections from presidential removal.

  • July 02, 2024

    2nd Circ. Won't Revive Broadway Producer's Blacklisting Suit

    The Second Circuit declined Tuesday to undo the tossing of an antitrust lawsuit brought by a Broadway producer who accused a stage workers union of illegally putting him on a "do not work" list, ruling that the union is shielded from liability since it acted in legitimate self-interest.

  • July 02, 2024

    Justices Revive FERC Solar Fight, Citing Chevron Ruling

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday ordered the D.C. Circuit to rethink its approval of a Federal Energy Regulatory Commission decision granting market benefits for a small-scale solar energy project in Montana following the justices' blockbuster decision upending judicial deference to regulatory agencies.

  • July 02, 2024

    NLRB Official Nixes IBEW Unit's Bid To Add More Workers

    System administrators can't join a bargaining unit of technicians represented by an International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers affiliate at a Florida aerospace facility, a National Labor Relations Board regional director determined, saying there isn't enough evidence that the administrators' role changed significantly.

  • July 01, 2024

    High Court's 1-2 Punch Sets Up Long-Standing Regs For KO

    By ending its term with a stinging combination against federal agencies, the U.S. Supreme Court's conservative bloc left behind a bruised bureaucracy and a regulatory system that's now vulnerable to a barrage of incoming attacks.

Expert Analysis

  • Water Cooler Talk: Investigation Lessons In 'Minority Report'

    Author Photo

    Tracey Diamond and Evan Gibbs at Troutman Pepper discuss how themes in Steven Spielberg's Science Fiction masterpiece "Minority Report" — including prediction, prevention and the fallibility of systems — can have real-life implications in workplace investigations.

  • NCAA's Antitrust Litigation History Offers Clues For NIL Case

    Author Photo

    Attorneys at Perkins Coie analyze the NCAA's long history of antitrust litigation to predict how state attorney general claims against NCAA recruiting rules surrounding name, image and likeness discussions will stand up in Tennessee federal court.

  • SAG-AFTRA Contract Is A Landmark For AI And IP Interplay

    Author Photo

    SAG-AFTRA's recently ratified contract with the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers introduced a framework to safeguard performers' intellectual property rights and set the stage for future discussions on how those rights interact with artificial intelligence — which should put entertainment businesses on alert for compliance, says Evynne Grover at QBE.

  • How Dartmouth Ruling Fits In NLRB Student-Athlete Playbook

    Author Photo

    A groundbreaking decision from a National Labor Relations Board official on Feb. 5 — finding that Dartmouth men's basketball players are employees who can unionize — marks the latest development in the board’s push to bring student-athletes within the ambit of federal labor law, and could stimulate unionization efforts in other athletic programs, say Jennifer Cluverius and Patrick Wilson at Maynard Nexsen.

  • What's At Stake In High Court NLRB Injunction Case

    Author Photo

    William Baker at Wigdor examines the U.S. Supreme Court's recent decision to hear Starbucks v. McKinney — where it will consider a long-standing circuit split over the standard for evaluating National Labor Relations Board injunction bids — and explains why the justices’ eventual decision, either way, is unlikely to be a significant blow to labor.

  • Employer Lessons From NLRB Judge's Union Bias Ruling

    Author Photo

    A National Labor Relations Board judge’s recent decision that a Virginia drywall contractor unlawfully transferred and fired workers who made union pay complaints illustrates valuable lessons about how employers should respond to protected labor activity and federal labor investigations, says Kenneth Jenero at Holland & Knight.

  • Workplace Speech Policies Limit Legal And PR Risks

    Author Photo

    As workers increasingly speak out on controversies like the 2024 elections and the Israel-Hamas war, companies should implement practical workplace expression policies and plans to protect their brands and mitigate the risk of violating federal and state anti-discrimination and free speech laws, say attorneys at McDermott.

  • Where Justices Stand On Chevron Doctrine Post-Argument

    Author Photo

    Following recent oral argument at the U.S. Supreme Court, at least four justices appear to be in favor of overturning the long-standing Chevron deference, and three justices seem ready to uphold it, which means the ultimate decision may rest on Chief Justice John Roberts' vote, say Wayne D'Angelo and Zachary Lee at Kelley Drye.

  • Trends That Will Shape The Construction Industry In 2024

    Author Photo

    Though the outlook for the construction industry is mixed, it is clear that 2024 will bring evolving changes aimed at building projects more safely and efficiently under difficult circumstances, and stakeholders would be wise to prepare for the challenges and opportunities these trends will bring, say Josephine Bahn and Jeffery Mullen at Cozen O'Connor.

  • A Focused Statement Can Ease Employment Mediation

    Author Photo

    Given the widespread use of mediation in employment cases, attorneys should take steps to craft mediation statements that efficiently assist the mediator by focusing on key issues, strengths and weaknesses of a claim, which can flag key disputes and barriers to a settlement, says Darren Rumack at Klein & Cardali.

  • 3 Areas Of Focus In Congressional Crosshairs This Year

    Author Photo

    Companies must prepare for Congress to build on its 2023 oversight priorities this year, continuing its vigorous inquiries into Chinese company-related investments, workplace safety and labor relations issues, and generative artificial intelligence, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • Water Cooler Talk: Insights On Noncompetes From 'The Office'

    Author Photo

    Troutman Pepper’s Tracey Diamond, Evan Gibbs, Constance Brewster and Jim Earle compare scenarios from “The Office” to the complex world of noncompetes and associated tax issues, as employers are becoming increasingly hesitant to look to noncompete provisions amid a potential federal ban.

  • 5 NLRA Changes To Make Nonunion Employers Wary In 2024

    Author Photo

    As the National Labor Relations Board continues pushing an aggressive pro-union agenda and a slate of strict workplace rules, nonunion employers should study significant labor law changes from 2023 to understand why National Labor Relations Act compliance will be so crucial to protecting themselves in the new year, say attorneys at Hunton.

Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the Employment Authority Labor archive.