Personal Injury & Medical Malpractice

  • June 17, 2024

    Fla. Condo Board Says Group Wrongly Accused It Of Crimes

    A Florida condominium association has brought a Miami-Dade County state court lawsuit against a residents group over defamation, accusing the group of luring tenants into a WhatsApp chat to disseminate false statements, including that board members committed crimes.

  • June 17, 2024

    US Surgeon General To Seek Warning Label On Social Media

    U.S. Surgeon General Vivek H. Murthy has called on lawmakers to require social media companies to put warnings on their sites that say young people who use them have more mental health issues, according to an opinion article published on Monday.

  • June 17, 2024

    NJ School District Settles Sex Abuse Suit For $2M

    A New Jersey school district has agreed to pay $2 million to an unidentified woman who claimed in a state court lawsuit that she was sexually abused by a former teacher when she was a 14 years old.

  • June 17, 2024

    Zantac Suits Must Exit State Court, Conn. Judge Told

    A Connecticut' state court judge must relinquish jurisdiction over two lawsuits claiming that generic versions of the heartburn drug Zantac caused cancer because state statutes do not subject entities with foreign business registrations to the auspices of Constitution State judges, a pharmaceutical industry attorney argued at a hearing Monday morning.

  • June 17, 2024

    Binance Says Hamas Attack Suit Can't Prove Fundraising Link

    Binance Holdings Ltd. has urged a New York federal judge to dismiss claims the exchange abetted terrorism because the survivors of Hamas' Oct. 7 attack on Israel haven't shown a direct link between the platform's cryptocurrency services and the planning of the attack.

  • June 17, 2024

    Colo. Justices To Review Prefiling Interest Cap Dispute

    The Colorado Supreme Court on Monday agreed to review whether a state court can let prefiling interest exceed the state's $1 million economic damages cap under the Health Care Availability Act, in a suit over a man's injuries at birth.

  • June 17, 2024

    Baldwin Prosecutors Push For 'Rust' Armorer's Testimony

    New Mexico state prosecutors are seeking to force a convicted armorer to testify during "Rust" actor-producer Alec Baldwin's involuntary manslaughter trial, telling a judge the "world is watching" how the court decides a potentially pivotal legal dispute in the high-profile case.

  • June 17, 2024

    Insurers Ask 6th Circ. To Undo $13.3M Murder Coverage Loss

    Two Liberty Mutual units said their insurers must reimburse them for a $13.3 million judgment stemming from a murder in a Florida motel, urging the Sixth Circuit on Monday to toss a lower court's ruling that a demand letter in the underlying suit didn't constitute a claim for bad faith.

  • June 17, 2024

    Clients Say McGrath Kavinoky 'Bullied' Them Into Abuse Deal

    California firm McGrath Kavinoky LLP, which inked more than $374 million in settlements for women who say they were sexually abused by a UCLA Health gynecologist, misled its clients and "bullied" them into accepting far smaller amounts than they were promised, according to a lawsuit in state court by two ex-clients.

  • June 17, 2024

    Ga. Panel OKs Instruction In $4.5M Spinal Device Injury Suit

    The Georgia Court of Appeals has affirmed a trial court's decision to tell jurors not to consider the availability of insurance benefits when considering the issues of liability and damages in a case in which a woman whose doctor incorrectly implanted a spinal cord stimulator was awarded $4.5 million.

  • June 17, 2024

    Talc Claimants Want Documents In Fight Over J&J Unit Venue

    Cancer patients with talc damage claims against Johnson & Johnson have urged a New Jersey federal court to give them access to transcripts and exhibits from depositions of top executives at the company's talc unit, saying the information will aid their effort to bar the J&J spinoff from filing a third Chapter 11 outside the Garden State.

  • June 17, 2024

    Justices Won't Hear Challenge To NY Gun, Ammo Sales Laws

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday denied a petition by New York gun shop owners seeking to appeal a decision striking down their suit challenging state laws regulating firearm sellers and ammunition sales.

  • June 14, 2024

    Judge Converts Alex Jones Ch. 11, Tosses Media Co.'s Case

    A Texas bankruptcy judge on Friday turned Alex Jones' bankruptcy case into a Chapter 7, allowing a trustee to liquidate the right-wing conspiracy theorist and media personality's assets to repay creditors, but declined to convert the Chapter 11 of the company that runs Jones' online show, dismissing its petition instead.

  • June 14, 2024

    Twirling Org. Must Pay $4.2M For Sexual Assault Of Teen Athlete

    The U.S. Twirling Association and a coach must pay nearly $4.2 million to a baton twirler who was sexually assaulted as a minor during a sponsored international trip, a New York federal jury has found, saying the organization was negligent when handpicking a chaperone.

  • June 14, 2024

    Blistering Dissents Belie Justices' Penchant For Consensus

    Thirteen days into June, the U.S. Supreme Court had recorded one of the highest rates of unanimous decisions in the past four decades. But the era of historic consensus was tarnished a bit Friday when the court issued three split decisions and two scathing dissents highlighting how much the nine justices differ.

  • June 14, 2024

    Monsanto Says Wash. Ruling Axes $275M PCB Verdict

    Monsanto has asked a Washington state appeals court to reverse a $275 million verdict against it in a suit over polychlorinated biphenyls exposure at a school site, saying a recent reversal of a $185 million verdict by the court in another case greatly bolsters its argument for another reversal.

  • June 14, 2024

    Judge Grants New Trial In Abu Ghraib Torture Liability Case

    A Virginia federal judge on Friday granted a new trial to victims of torture at the Abu Ghraib military prison in Iraq who have accused a CACI International unit of aiding and abetting their ordeal, after a jury deadlocked in the case.

  • June 14, 2024

    FAA Probes Fake Titanium Docs From Boeing Supplier

    The Federal Aviation Administration said Friday that it's investigating whether certain Boeing Co. jets were manufactured with titanium components that may have been sold to the plane maker with falsified authenticity documents.

  • June 14, 2024

    Steakhouse Can't Shake Off $2.5M Verdict In NJ Injury Suit

    A New Jersey federal judge has denied Outback Steakhouse's bid for a new trial after a jury awarded $2.5 million to a woman who slipped and broke her hip and femur in one of its Garden State restaurants, stating the company was late with some arguments and unconvincing with others.

  • June 14, 2024

    'Alkaline Water' Co. Owes Another $3.1B For Liver Failures

    A Las Vegas jury awarded $3 billion in punitive damages and $89.75 million in compensatory damages Friday to a group of children and adults who experienced severe liver problems after drinking toxin-adulterated "alkaline water," adding to the product maker's legal woes.

  • June 14, 2024

    Political Speech Groups Challenge NJ Judicial Privacy Case

    Two voting-integrity groups moved Friday to dismiss federal claims brought against them under New Jersey's Daniel's Law on the grounds that their business of publishing voter registration information is political speech protected by the First Amendment and federal voting rights laws.

  • June 14, 2024

    Chamblee Ryan Gets $1M Legal Malpractice Verdict Tossed

    Chamblee Ryan PC has escaped a $1.1 million jury verdict in a malpractice suit brought by former client JBS Carriers Inc., with a Texas appeals court finding that the food transportation giant failed to submit expert testimony showing that the firm was negligent in failing to settle an underlying car crash lawsuit.

  • June 14, 2024

    Dunkin' Franchise Must Face Customer's Race Bias Suit

    An intermediate appellate court in Massachusetts on Friday revived part of a lawsuit brought by a Black customer of a Dunkin' franchise who says an employee deliberately ignored his order for 15 minutes, then threw his food at him and called him a racist epithet.

  • June 14, 2024

    Justices Overturn ATF Rule Banning Bump Stocks

    The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Friday that the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives does not have the authority to ban bump stocks, finding that the firearm accessory can't be considered a machine gun for purposes of the National Firearms Act.

  • June 13, 2024

    Colo. News Station Must Face Claim Over Contractor Shooting

    A Denver news station must face a man's vicarious liability claim over the actions of a plainclothes security guard who shot and killed a man during a police protest while working for the TV station, the Colorado Court of Appeals said Thursday.

Expert Analysis

  • Think Like A Lawyer: Always Be Closing

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    When a lawyer presents their case with the right propulsive structure throughout trial, there is little need for further argument after the close of evidence — and in fact, rehashing it all may test jurors’ patience — so attorneys should consider other strategies for closing arguments, says Luke Andrews at Poole Huffman.

  • Confronting The Psychological Toll Of Personal Injury Law

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    Personal injury lawyers advocate for clients who have experienced trauma, loss and life-altering injuries, but these cases can have an emotional impact on attorneys themselves — so it is crucial to address these challenges proactively and openly, and normalize the conversation around mental health in the legal profession, says Lisa Lanier at Lanier Law Group.

  • Series

    Playing Chess Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    There are many ways that chess skills translate directly into lawyer skills, but for me, the bigger career lessons go beyond the direct parallels — playing chess has shown me the value of seeing gradual improvement in and focusing deep concentration on a nonwork endeavor, says attorney Steven Fink.

  • Litigation Inspiration: Attys Can Be Heroic Like Olympians

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    Although litigation won’t earn anyone an Olympic medal in Paris this summer, it can be worthy of the same lasting honor if attorneys exercise focused restraint — seeking both their clients’ interests and those of the court — instead of merely pursuing every advantage short of sanctionable conduct, says Bennett Rawicki at Hilgers Graben.

  • Updated Federal Rules Can Improve Product Liability MDLs

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    The recent amendment of a federal evidence rule regarding expert testimony and the proposal of a civil rule on managing early discovery in multidistrict legislation hold great promise for promoting the uniform and efficient processes that high-stakes product liability cases particularly need, say Alan Klein and William Heaston at Duane Morris.

  • Lean Into The 'Great Restoration' To Retain Legal Talent

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    As the “great resignation,” in which employees voluntarily left their jobs in droves, has largely dissipated, legal employers should now work toward the idea of a “great restoration,” adopting strategies to effectively hire, onboard and retain top legal talent, says Molly McGrath at Hiring & Empowering Solutions.

  • Boeing Saga Underscores Need For Ethical Corporate Culture

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    In the wake of recent allegations about Boeing’s safety culture, and amid the U.S. Department of Justice’s new whistleblower incentives, business leaders should reinvigorate their emphasis on compliance by making clear that long-term profitability requires ethical business practices, says Maxwell Carr-Howard at Dentons.

  • Why Jurors Balk At 'I Don't Recall' — And How To Respond

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    Jurors often react negatively to a witness who responds “I don’t remember” because they tend to hold erroneous beliefs about the nature of human memory, but attorneys can adopt a few strategies to mitigate the impact of these biases, say Steve Wood and Ava Hernández at Courtroom Sciences.

  • Opinion

    Bankruptcy Judges Can Justly Resolve Mass Tort Cases

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    Johnson & Johnson’s recent announcement of a prepackaged reorganization plan for its talc unit highlights that Chapter 11 is a continually evolving living statute that can address new types of problems with reorganization, value and job preservation, and just treatment for creditors, says Kenneth Rosen at Ken Rosen Advisors PC.

  • An Insurance Coverage Checklist For PFAS Defendants

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    With PFAS liability exposures attracting increased media attention, now is a good time for companies that could be exposed to liability related to per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances to review existing and past insurance policies, and consider taking proactive steps to maximize their likelihood of coverage, say attorneys at Nossaman.

  • Series

    Fishing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Atop the list of ways fishing makes me a better lawyer is the relief it offers from the chronic stress of a demanding caseload, but it has also improved my listening skills and patience, and has served as an exceptional setting for building earnest relationships, says Steven DeGeorge​​​​​​​ at Robinson Bradshaw.

  • 10 Tips To Build Trust With Your Witness During Trial Prep

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    Preparing a witness for deposition or trial requires more than just legal skills — lawyers must also work to cultivate trust with the witness, using strategies ranging from wearing a hat when conducting mock cross-examination to offering them a ride to court before they testify, say Faye Paul Teller and Sara McDermott at Munger Tolles.

  • A Healthier Legal Industry Starts With Emotional Intelligence

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    The legal profession has long been plagued by high rates of mental health issues, in part due to attorneys’ early training and broader societal stereotypes — but developing one’s emotional intelligence is one way to foster positive change, collectively and individually, says attorney Esperanza Franco.

  • To Make Your Legal Writing Clear, Emulate A Master Chef

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    To deliver clear and effective written advocacy, lawyers should follow the model of a fine dining chef — seasoning a foundation of pure facts with punchy descriptors, spicing it up with analogies, refining the recipe and trimming the fat — thus catering to a sophisticated audience of decision-makers, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • Circuit Judge Writes An Opinion, AI Helps: What Now?

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    Last week's Eleventh Circuit opinion in Snell v. United Specialty Insurance, notable for a concurrence outlining the use of artificial intelligence to evaluate a term's common meaning, is hopefully the first step toward developing a coherent basis for the judiciary's generative AI use, says David Zaslowsky at Baker McKenzie.

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